One of the original thirteen

20 Sep

150d3c7ebff90ca4454b7851b116f3f9Today Delaware may be best known for its tax breaks, being home to the school that set the stage for “Dead Poets Society” and its gem of a coastline, but the most delicious fact about the second smallest state in the country (and most densely populated) is something from its past.

Scrapple, a pot pudding made from meat scraps and grains, became the staple cuisine for the area by Quakers in the early 1700s. It was created due to their Puritanical ways, and generations since have carried on the tradition.

Eat

1371591213278

Courtesy of the Food Network

Scrapple is primarily sage and pork, (the cornmeal is tasteless) but hot peppers can be added. Many season it with ground black pepper. It’s pan-fried and usually served as a side at breakfast. While scrapple appears to be exotic, it seems as though it can be found just about anywhere in Delaware Valley region.

Served in quartered slices, plain or with sweet or savory condiments: apple butter, ketchup, jelly, maple syrup, honey, or mustard.

Go

 

19990320_1606483366042919_2054618816285320953_n (1)Embrace your inner fall festive and attend the 26th annual Bridgeville Apple-Scrapple Festival October 13-14. This small town has some of the best apples in the mid-Atlantic region and organizers expect 25,000 to attend. Start the morning with an all you can eat scrapple breakfast, followed by carnival rides, kids’ games, scrapple chunkin’, scrapple carving, live entertainment, car show, trade show, two craft show and food, including a BBQ, oyster sandwiches, apple fritters, scrapple sandwiches, hamburgers, hot dogs, ice cream and more.

For more information visit applescrapple.com.

 

Page-to-Pantry

Scrapple

6 servings

 

1-cup white or yellow cornmeal

1-cup milk

1 tsp sugar

1 tsp salt

2 ¾ cups boiling water

8 oz bulk pork sausage, cooked, drained and crumbled

All-purpose flour

2 tbsp butter

Maple syrup, optional

In a saucepan, combine the cornmeal, milk, sugar, and salt; gradually stir in water. Cook and stir until thickened and bubbly. Reduce heat; cook, covered, 10 minutes longer or until very thick, stirring occasionally. Remove from the heat and stir in sausage. Pour into a greased 7 ½-inch by 3 ½-inch by 2-inch loaf pan (the pan will be very full). Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerator.

To serve, unmold and cut into quarter slices. Dip both sides in flour. In a skillet, melt butter over medium heat; brown scrapple on both sides.

Serve with maple syrup if desired.

 

Excerpt from “Taste of Home,” Originally published as Cornmeal Scrapple in Country February/March 1992, p49

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: